3 Signs You May Need A Hearing Aid

It may happen in the most subtle of ways. We may need to raise the volume on the TV a little higher. We may have to ask someone to repeat instructions over the phone. Hearing loss can sneak up on you. While our initial reaction could be to shrug it off, it’s potentially the beginning of a longer-term issue.

Hearing aids may not seem appealing, but the right adjustments could prevent profound hearing loss later in life. There are ways to know when it may be time to check what’s causing your hearing loss.

You’re Finding It Hard To Hear People.

Hearing Health USA, an audiologist company specializing in hearing aids, hearing tests, pediatrics, and tinnitus treatments nationwide, recommends protective hearing aid wearers gage the extent of their difficulties, whether it’s feeling like you can’t understand a conversation, or are cranking the TV up much higher than before. Hearing aids can be calibrated to adjust incoming sounds to adjust to your personal hearing loss.

Reaching for the remote control and raising the volume can be associated with conductive hearing loss. Conductive hearing loss is the result of a problem with the outer or middle ear, preventing sound from traveling to the inner ear.

This can be brought on by a variety of reasons, sometimes as simple as earwax buildup, ear infections, or problems with the middle ear bones. Conductive hearing loss can often be temporary and treatable.

In certain cases, hearing amplifiers are the best in small devices to help individuals regain normal hearing in different environments. Amplification not only impacts the sound quality but also makes for a better adjustment than certain hearing technology.



You Have Trouble Hearing In Noisy Environments.

It’s understandably to have some hearing difficulty when there is a lot of background noise surrounding you, but sometimes, we find ourselves hearing the conversations but unable to translate the comments.

This is associated with sensorineural hearing loss, a problem that occurs with the inner ear. The inner ear is where the auditory nerve is located, which is a response for sound traveling to the brain for interpretation. Damage to the inner ear can be caused by exposure to high noise levels over time, affecting what’s called the hair cells, the receptive cells of the organ.

Sensorineural hearing loss is typically permanent and can fluctuate or worsen over time. The severity of your hearing loss can even lead to other symptoms, including tinnitus, the ringing of your ears, as well as dizziness.

Usually, the best treatment for sensorineural hearing loss is hearing aids. Each individual’s loss and accompanying symptoms are different and should be evaluated by a professional.

You Have Trouble Hearing A Certain Pitch.

Hearing loss within a specific frequency range is common, especially at higher frequencies and tones. It’s possible your grandchild said something to you and it’s translating, or your wife or daughter. Those higher pitches can become difficult to hear over time as opposed to deeper male voices.

This can be tied to what’s known as mixed hearing loss, a combination of elements seen in both conductive and sensorineural hearing loss.

Mixed hearing loss may be temporary in certain cases, while others may be permanent. For example, someone with a mixed hearing loss may be able to have the conductive element medically treated however, the underlying sensorineural hearing loss will remain.

Assistive listening devices are commonly referred by physicians for deafness associated with mixed hearing loss. In addition to potential electronic devices, medicines or surgeries are options that physicians and audiologists could suggest depending on severity.

To determine proper diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss, it is recommended that people of all ages undergo a comprehensive hearing test to review results and determine the best steps forward with hearing care professionals.

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